Reaching Resolution Revisited

To end our story we have to have some form of resolution. We’ve already discussed the different sorts of endings and how we can anything from complete closure to an ambiguous end or a cliff-hanger but we’ve still got to bring all these pesky plot threads together. If you struggle with this don’t worry, a … Continue reading Reaching Resolution Revisited

Advertisements

Getting From A to Oh Revisited

No plot would be complete without stumbling blocks. If stories didn’t have ‘oh’ moments they’d be a lot shorter and less satisfying. Readers like to see the characters struggle through challenges because it amplifies the achievement of winning, though it can be tempting to make things easier for them. These stumbling blocks are either built … Continue reading Getting From A to Oh Revisited

Subbing Your Story Revisited

Most stories have at least one subplot that runs alongside the main plot. Some of these run the full length of the story, some are short little side routes. For example, in the Sherlock Holmes stories the main plot  is the case and the secondary plot is Holmes and Watson’s friendship and runs concurrent to … Continue reading Subbing Your Story Revisited

Where’s Your Tools? Revisited

So our main character has a problem, what are we going to do about it? Do they need some characters to help them? Do they need to get some tech or something to help them? Are they going to have to get somewhere to solve this problem? How? Each of these things that move a … Continue reading Where’s Your Tools? Revisited

What’s Your Problem? Revisited

At its most basic plot is the presentation of a problem that needs to be solved: the detective needs to catch the criminal, the lovers need to come together, the world needs to be saved. So when we’re beginning to plot a story we need to think, ‘What is the problem?’ then ‘How are we … Continue reading What’s Your Problem? Revisited

Everything Ends Revisited

As we’ve discussed in previous articles sometimes our characters don’t survive the story, or do they? There are many instances in the history of literature where characters appear to have died but have returned. The most famous possibly being Sherlock Holmes who died but was resurrected by popular demand. The problem we might have, other … Continue reading Everything Ends Revisited

Creating Romantic Tension Revisited

One of the issues with writing a romance plot or sub-plot can be a sense that the characters have fallen in love ‘too soon’. Perhaps this phrasing is slightly misleading; we can have romantic tension where characters fall in love but don’t realise it or are kept apart, we might have the slowly growing romance, … Continue reading Creating Romantic Tension Revisited

Creating Romance Arcs Revisited

Once again I’m going to say you don’t have to plan out a story before you begin, we can easily shape it after we finish the first draft. And when I refer to arcs I’m not going to give you a rigid structure, partly due to the potential variation in stories and partly because a … Continue reading Creating Romance Arcs Revisited

Tangled Triangles Revisited

As we mentioned earlier in the series we have can have a relationship with a romantic antagonist who is constantly trying to break up the relationship for their own gain. We may also have the romantic rival who has potential as part of this relationship, I phrase it this way because the romantic rival doesn’t … Continue reading Tangled Triangles Revisited

Why These People? Revisited

Before I begin I should say you don’t have to plan if that doesn’t work for you, I never do. You can intend to add a romance to your story or it can appear as you write, that’s fine too. In this article we’re going to look at questions we can ask before we start … Continue reading Why These People? Revisited